Monday, December 12, 2016

Charlemagne: An Overview of the King of the Franks

December’s Coffee with the Curator, “A Christmas Empire: The Birth and Rise of the Nation with Charlmegane’s Surprise Coronation” will be presented by historian Austin Setter. The presentation will set the stage of the rise of the Carolingian dynasty in the early Middle Ages and the development of nations that will become states, as well as the controversy over Charlemagne’s Christmas Coronation. 

Charlemagne held many important titles, including Emperor of the Romans, King of the Lombards, and King of the Franks. He has also been called the Father of Europe, as he united much of Western Europe for the first time since the Roman Empire.

Charlemagne (742-814), King of the Franks 768-814, Holy Roman Emperor 800-814, circa late 700s.

“King of the Franks” may sound like a funny title now, but in Charlemagne’s time, his royal title meant he governed the Francia/Frankia monarchy in the Middle Ages from 768 to 814. The kingdom’s geography shifted over time but was generally centered on the Meuse and Rhine rivers in northern Europe.

Equestrian statue of Charlemagne near Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, France

Charlemagne led many campaigns and wars and was engaged in almost constant battle throughout his reign. His legacy is also remembered for his many reforms: cultural, military, governmental, and monetary. However, one of the most fascinating aspects to Charlemagne’s life is the controversy surrounding his coronation, which has been long cause for debate among historians.

Want to know more about Charlemagne’s coronation and find out whether the history of it being a surprise is true or not? Join us December 15 from 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. for Coffee with the Curator at the Museum of World Treasures. Enjoy coffee from The Spice Merchant, pastries, and new friendships. Although this is designed for seniors, everyone is welcome to attend this fun and educational program. Admission is discounted to just $4 per person, and members are free. Visit www.worldtreasures.org to learn more.

Monday, November 14, 2016

Thanksgiving: Fact vs. Fiction

November’s Coffee with the Curator, titled “The First Thanksgiving: Myths & Realities” features Dr. Carolyn Speer Schmidt speaking about the true history of the holiday and explains some of the misconceptions that surround Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving is a national holiday celebrated in the United States that originated as a day to give thanks for the harvest. Unique, unrelated Thanksgiving celebrations are held in various countries as well. America’s version of Thanksgiving stems from English traditions during the Protestant Reformation (a division within the Roman Catholic Church in 16th century Europe). There are some interpretations of the events that led to the holiday’s creation, though it is generally accepted that English settlers known as Pilgrims were brought to North America on a ship called The Mayflower. Upon arriving in Cape Cod Harbor, the Pilgrims established a colony named Plymouth in 1621.



For as long as most people can recall, Thanksgiving has always fallen on the fourth Thursday each November. However, this date was chosen in 1941, so the holiday has not always occurred on such a consistent schedule. The original feast in 1621 likely occurred sometime between September 21 and November 11. Also, Thanksgiving was traditionally a three day holiday, rather than a single day.

When people imagine pilgrims, they often picture black and white clothing with large buckles on shoes, hats, and clothes. This is inaccurate, as buckles didn’t come into vogue until later in the 17th century. Pilgrims were not monochromatic, either. Women wore red, gray, brown, green, and blue, and men wore white, brown, black, and beige.



Turkey and Thanksgiving go together like peanut butter and jelly. But has it always been that way? No. Pilgrims originally ate deer, not turkey. If any kind of poultry was served, it would’ve been a side dish - never the main entree. Other foods they might’ve eaten include lots of seafood, like cod, oysters, clams and bass. And there wasn’t a pumpkin pie to be found on any Pilgrim’s table.




Join us November 17 from 9:00 - 10:00 a.m. for Coffee with the Curator at the Museum of World Treasures. Enjoy coffee from The Spice Merchant, pastries, and new friendships. Although this is designed for seniors, everyone is welcome to attend this fun and educational program. Admission is discounted to just $4 per person, and members are free. Visit www.worldtreasures.org to learn more.

Monday, November 7, 2016

This Friday: Public Unveiling of Forgotten Heroes: Conflict in Korea, 1951-1953

From 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on Veterans Day, Friday, November 11, the long awaited, and newest, exhibit Forgotten Heroes: Conflict in Korea, 1951-1953 will be unveiled to the public. Newly donated and never before seen objects from the Museum’s collection will be displayed alongside all new interpretive signs and displays focusing on those who served in what is often known as “The Forgotten War”.



Among the new items to be displayed are a portable chaplain’s field organ, two military pilot’s jackets, and personal photos and service uniform from Marine Sgt. Ronald Russ. Sgt. Russ’s wife, Donna, said of the new display “I am very pleased that this can be done at the Museum. [Ron] was very honored to be a Marine and I was very proud of him and his family was, too.”



At the public opening, you will be able to interact with Korean War veterans, talk to staff about the exhibit, and engage in activities to learn more about heroes of the war. To honor veterans, the Museum will be offering free admission to all active duty and retired military with a valid military ID card or Department of Veteran Affairs card.

Visit the Museum of World Treasures at 835 E 1st Street, Wichita, KS. The Museum is open seven days a week; Monday through Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and Sunday from 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. To learn more, visit www.worldtreasures.org